Johannes Kepler

Johannes Kepler was the born into a poor German family. His father worked as a taverner and later became a mercenary soldier, apparently dying in battle when Johannes was a boy. Kepler himself was a sickly child and fell victim to small pox. His sight was severely affected as a result. His family were Lutherans…

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A Borax Mine

The open pit mine of U.S. Borax at Boron, California, is the world’s principal source of borates. To expose the ore, which lies approximately 300-600 feet below the surface, the overburden is removed by using explosives, electric shovels, and gigantic trucks. Boron is a very hard, black, shiny, solid. Although it is somewhat metallic in…

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Why Don’t My Cooking Utensils Corrode?

Recently a friend with a rusty car asked me ‘why don’t my cooking utensils corrode like this?’  Well, I explained. they are made of stainless steel. Stainless steel is an alloy containing other things besides iron.  For example, stainless steel contains at least ten percent chromium, together with various amounts of elements like manganese, silicon,…

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Purple Dye – The Colour of Royalty

Archeological evidence shows that purple dyes were used in Crete around nineteen hundred B.C.  Legend credits the discovery of purple dye to Heraklos’ dog, whose mouth was stained with purple after chewing on snails.  Heraklos gave a purple robe to the king, who decreed that rulers of Phoenicia should henceforth wear this colour as a…

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The Salmon’s Amazing Journey

There are mysteries associated with the ability of salmon to return home to spawn after years of migration over huge distances.  Adult salmon lay their eggs in gravelly river beds, where fast water flows.  Within days, these mature females die.  After two or three years their relatively small offspring swim downstream to find the plentiful…

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The Amazing Properties of Water

Ron Hughes:  David, we’ve talked about some amazingly complex things, but God is not just the God of the complex.  There are some wonderfully simple things, or things that to us seem simple and common, ordinary, everyday – and yet when we look passed the obvious we see God written all over them. And water…

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Blast Furnaces

The Blast Furnace Iron ore, coke, and limestone are added at the top of the furnace, and air is blown in at the bottom. The oxygen of the air reacts with the hot coke to form carbon monoxide. This gas passes up the furnace, changing the iron oxide to iron as it moves down. Liquid…

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Aluminum

Aluminum is the most abundant of all the metals.  As well, it is the third most abundant element on the earth’s surface (oxygen and silicon being more common).  Because aluminum is a rather reactive metal, it is not found in nature in the free state.  However, its compounds are very common.  It occurs as aluminum…

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Clever People Make Mistakes Too

The history of science is full of examples of very clever people getting things wrong.  Pythagoras’ name is known to everyone who studied geometry because of his famous theorem about a right angled triangle.  Although a bright mathematician, he believed in reincarnation and the evil effects of beans! Sir Isaac Newton, often called the greatest…

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The Brain Needs Rest And Stimulation

Our bodies need rest, but it’s the brain that needs sleep.  What happens in the brain makes the difference between resting and sleeping.  Merely resting can slow the heart rate and respiration, and decrease our adrenalin level.  However, it’s the diminishing brain activity that causes us to go to sleep.  But even in sleep, the…

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