A Big Prize from a Little Known Man

In spite of the publicity surrounding the yearly announcement of the Nobel prizes, many know little about Alfred Nobel, the man who endowed them. Nobel was a successful Swedish industrialist and inventor, best known for the invention of dynamite.  The standard explosive of the day in the construction business was nitroglycerine.  However, it had the…

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Our Sensitive Touch

Most of us take the three thousand square inches of skin that sheaths our body for granted. Throughout this sensitive wrapping, there are hundreds of thousands of sensory nerves.  Huge numbers of them are clustered at the base of every hair, so that the slightest breath stirs some of them, while others signal whether the…

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Ivan Pavlov

Ivan Pavlov was a Russian scientist whose work bridged the disciplines of physiology and psychology. Although he was by training a doctor, his most significant contribution lay in the field of behavioral psychology. After working as an experimental researcher, Pavlov became head of the department of physiology at Russia’s Institute of Experimental Medicine. Pavlov received…

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Linus Pauling

Linus Pauling was born in Portland, Oregon, in 1901. He graduated from Oregon State College in 1922 and obtained his Ph.D. in chemistry in 1925 from the California Institute of Technology. After a period of study in Europe, he became a professor at the California Institute of Technology in 1927. He remained there for the…

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Objective Truth

Ron Hughes: Dr. David Humphreys is a scientist and he is also a Christian.  David, explain to us, as a scientist, how you seek out objective truth. Dr. Humphreys:  Remember, Ron, a scientist is still a human being.  You know, we sometimes put science on a bit of a pedestal as if this was the…

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Why Is The Sky Dark At Night?

When I asked my wife why the sky is dark at night, she said, “It’s because the sun’s not shining!”  Yet generations of astronomers have struggled to answer this question.  It’s become known as Olbers’ Paradox.  Although it’s one that few spend time thinking about, for cosmologists it’s always been important. The darkness of the…

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Just Where Am I?

I reflected recently on how technology has changed map making.  In ancient times map makers had to face innumerable dangers, disease and shipwreck, in their efforts to make an accurate survey of a coastline.  And mapping the interior of a country involved battling deserts, mountains and impassable rivers. Even after the field data was collected,…

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Why Am I A Lefty?

I am one of the ten percent of the population who’s left-handed.  In school, I was told not to use my left hand for writing, but I found it impossible to comply.  I have since learned to survive in a right-handed world. Why most people are right-handed is still something of a mystery.  A popular…

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How Long Will I Live?

The life expectancy tables used by insurance companies give a clear picture about our longevity.  This explains why smokers pay fifty percent more on their insurance policies.  Research has verified that the cost of smoking entails more than the money spent on cigarettes. Life expectancy in Western countries has been increasing steadily over the last…

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